Segment 9

Annotation

Disanza was in the boy scouts as a kid but it did not prepare him for Burma. Disanza had originally joined the Navy but did not like the ocean at all. Disanza helped to train Ho Chi Minh’s soldiers. Disanza was out in the field and was contacted and told that he was to train some of the Ho Chi Minh soldiers. Disanza had the Ho Chi Minh soldiers for two weeks but he got rid of them after that because they were sadistic. They mutilated the guys that they killed. Disanza did not stand for the mutilation. It was a waste of time in Disanzas eyes. Disanza taught them and it upsets him knowing that some of the guys he trained fought against Americans in Vietnam. Some people in that situation do horrible things but Disanza made the effort to not be sadistic. They were already dead and there was no reason to hack them up. Most of the guys Disanza served with had the same ideas. Disanza taught the Ho Chi Minh soldiers how to shoot and how to attack a force. They made sure whenever possible to sneak up on a group and shoot them all at once. Disanza notes that the Japanese knew how to live off of the land better then the Americans. Disanza recalls some of the words that he had to know in order to do his job. Disanza could tell by the inflection in their voice whether they were in trouble or not. It was a challenge to work with the locals. They never questioned Disanza however and that made his job a lot easier. The locals in Burma hated the Japanese to begin with. It was easy to train the locals who wanted to fight and kill the Japanese to begin with. Disanza was in the Merchant Marine at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack. He was on his way to Cape Town, South Africa. He was hanging off of the side of the ship painting it. Everyone was nervous finding out about war because they thought that they could be torpedoed.

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