Growing Up and Entering the Service

The Strain of Combat on Leadership

Moving On and Off the Line

Securing Hill 516

Preparing Defensive Positions

Engaging the Enemy

Attack on the Sunken Road

Continuing the Fight

After the War

Infantry Combat and Medical Care

Medal of Honor Actions

Last Days of the War

Families and Military Decorations

Career in Military Service

Importance of History

Casualties from a Single Action

Munich

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Charles Murray is a retired US Army Colonel. He was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1921. His mother was from Maryland. His dad was from North Carolina and served in World War 1 and stayed at Fort Meade, Maryland. After a year or two, they moved to Wilmington, North Carolina. After Murray graduated, he went to the University of North Carolina and majored in accounting. He planned on taking law after graduating. After his third year of undergrad the Army called and he entered in September 1942. Murray was a proud member of the Boy Scouts of the America. He made Life Scout but did not make Eagle Scout. Murray was the assistant manager of the football team and the manager of the boxing team. College was wonderful for him. He entered UNC in the summer of 1939. Chapel Hill seemed like the right fit. Murray enjoyed life as a student at UNC. The summer after his third year he joined the Army and was sworn in at Fort Bragg, North Carolina in September 1942. From Fort Bragg, he went to Camp Wolters, Texas for basic training. Murray went to the noncommissioned officers school. In January 1943, he entered officer candidate school at Fort Benning, Georgia. Murray received his commission as a second lieutenant on 22 April 1943. The training was great. A lot of the basic training was just a continuation of Boy Scout training. Building fires, cooking meals, and shooting were nothing new to Murray. He was permitted to go out by himself at age 12 to hunt. After Murray finished basic training he married his girlfriend. She joined him and they were married near Camp Wolters in November 1942. His wife was a great military wife and a great military mother. After officers candidate school he went to Little Rock, Arkansas where he trained troops. He then went with a group to Tyler, Texas and helped open a new training camp. Murray eventually ended up at Fort Meade, Maryland. He stayed at Fort Meade for about a year before he went to Europe. Some of Murray's sergeants came through his training area. Murray went to England in August 1944 on a British cruise ship with about 5,000 people aboard. He stayed in England for a short while then joined the 3rd Infantry Division in France. Murray landed at Omaha Beach 80 to 100 days after D-Day [Annotator's Note: 6 June 1944]. Murray was assigned to a replacement depot until the 3rd Infantry Division finished their job in Southern France. Murray feels fortunate and glad that he was assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division.

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Charles Murray was with 25 second lieutenants in the back of a truck going across France. He was a first lieutenant by the time he got to France. Murray was assigned to the 30th Infantry Regiment. He remembers sewing on the division patch for the first time. He was assigned to Company C, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division as the platoon leader of 3rd Platoon. The day Murray joined his platoon it was down to 22 men. Murray got to look over the platoons and choose which one he wanted to lead. He chose the 3rd Platoon for some reason he does not remember. [Annotator's Note: The video skips as a result of pausing the recording per Murray's request.] They had a situation where all three first lieutenants were wounded in an action. Murray was acting company commander for a few days until they sent one of the wounded lieutenants back. That lieutenant was wounded again three days later. He and Murray were talking over a map when a piece of shrapnel went through his wrist. It crippled him so badly he never returned. Murray ended up commanding the company for three weeks until another one of the first lieutenants came back from the hospital. On 8 December 1944, near Strasbourg, France, Murray was made permanent company commander. The three lieutenants who were wounded in the same action were wounded near the same place. Murray had been sent off with his platoon on a separate mission. They were ordered to take the main street in the town and the fighting was intense. They still had 22 guys in their platoon at that point. In a one hour battle they killed 15 Germans and captured about 30. Murray was ordered to bring his sergeants back to the company command post. They were told to set up mines to block any advance from German tanks. Murray volunteered to help get the mines in position. They selected three riflemen and a bazooka team to go out in front of the platoon that night. They dug the mines in and stationed five soldiers to guard the position. Murray went back to the company command post and on the way they heard a barrage of artillery. Ten to 15 minutes later one of the radio operators told Murray to get back to the headquarters because there had been a bad situation. The command post was in a house and did not follow proper blackout procedures. A soldier sat in a window to eat his rations, not realizing he was giving away the position. A German gunner saw it and fired and they hit the house. Almost everyone in the room, including Murray's three lieutenants, were wounded. The company commander did eventually return to the unit after about two or three days. Murray describes the incident where the lieutenant was wounded in the wrist. They continued the fight that day, it was tough going and the Germans they faced were hardened.

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Charles Murray was told that a new unit was going to replace theirs after dark. They were spread out. Murray had 20 men total in his three rifle platoons [Annotator's Note: Murray was the company commander of Company C, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division]. One platoon was down to five men. The replacements were taking their time. Murray was trying to figure out how to place 140 men where they only had places for about 20 men. A platoon leader informed Murray that the replacement company was on its way but had run into an artillery barrage and dispersed. They had been ordered to not turn their radios on. The lieutenant got his people together and Murray was able to position his platoon where the 40 men under Murray had been. After a couple of hours the company commander came forward and he had organized the company which was dispersed by the artillery. They redeployed the company and were able to swap out weapons. Murray had mortar and machine gun squads and they were able to swap out and replace each other adequately. They went back to another small town in France to reequip and retrain. The company commander stayed with Murray and his unit all the way across to the Vosges Mountains. Crossing the Vosges Mountains was tough because it was raining most of the time. They had a lot of night time work. Their troops were trained to fight at night. Murray sensed that the Germans did not like to fight at night. Sometimes they could sneak single file past the German lines at night and when they woke up in the morning they had no idea Americans would be attacking from the rear. They did that on at least two occasions. They entered the Strasbourg area and stayed there for two or three days. They were looking for Germans that might have stayed behind to protect the Rhine River. The 2nd French Armored Division was working in tandem with Murray's unit. They were assigned to be the rifle battalion that worked in conjunction with the French. They worked as a team for five or six days around the Rhine River. Murray's company moved forward and they accomplished the mission of the French Division. After that action they returned to the Strasbourg area where they rested and refitted their equipment. It was nice for the guys to get a meal that was not in a tin can.

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Charles Murray was told by the regimental commander on 13 December [Annotator's Note: 13 December 1944] to go south. Murray's unit [Annotator's Note: Company C, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division] was to be in reserve. They had to replace elements of the 36th Infantry Division. The French Army had created a semicircle around the remaining Germans in the area. They were attached to the 1st French Army near that semicircle. Murray and his unit got there around the night of 14 December. They were at the foothills of the Vosges Mountains. The regimental commander committed two of his battalions and they got into hand to hand combat with the Germans. Two battalions were committed to Kaysersberg. The Kaiser of Germany used to vacation there which is how the town got the name. The Alsace area of France historically had sometimes been German and sometimes it was French. It snowed on the night of 15 December. The battalion commander informed Murray that his unit would be committed. The engineers were building a bridge to cross a nearby river. Murray's was the second company in line to cross the bridge. When Murray crossed the bridge, he told two of the men behind him to check on a house. When the men got up there, two Germans walked out of the house and were taken prisoner. They crossed the river and set up south of the town near a hill. The hill was a key point because it could control the town. They could almost see the Rhine River from that hill. The hill offered control of the entire valley. That was Hill 516.

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When Charles Murray got to the top of the hill [Annotator's Note: Hill 516 near Kaysersberg, France] he told everybody to rest because they had been marching for awhile. Murray found a place to sleep the night before. The shelter was covered enough so that Murray could pull out his maps and flashlight and get his bearings for the next day's movement. Murray's troops had not had much rest. His job was to put up a defensive position on the south side of the hill. The other company commanders assumed positions on the hill. Murray had to make a reconnaissance movement in the early morning hours to scout out mortar and machine gun positions. He had to scope out the valley beyond and figure out how to get there. Murray gathered his platoon sergeants and gave the order for the 1st and 2nd Platoons to go into defensive positions. Murray found out later in the hospital that one of the places where he had specifically ordered a machine gun set up had knocked out about 50 Germans attempting to make a counter attack. When the guys were just waking up, Murray had to send one platoon down the hill into the valley to set up a position. Murray had a new lieutenant and had not seen him operate in combat yet. Murray decided to walk with him down the hill. Murray called to his radio operator and told him to come with him. Murray walked down the hill with two scouts out in front of him. After a short way down the trail, with the upside to his left and the downside on his right, one of the scouts pointed out a large group of Germans. Murray was able to figure out different routes to attack from. The nearest Germans were about 200 yards from where he was viewing them from. Murray started placing his soldiers in advantageous positions. Since they had no air support they called for artillery support. Murray borrowed the lieutenant's Walkie Talkie radio. He gave his executive officer his location then radioed the position of the Germans. They fired one round and it was over and about 100 yards. Murray corrected the fire and it came in pretty close. Murray was just about to tell the whole battalion to fire for effect but the radio went dead. Murray passed the word for someone to go back and get a mortar.

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As soon as the artillery rounds got close, Charles Murray could not call in corrections because the batteries in his radio went dead. He knew something should be done to keep the enemy occupied until communications could be reestablished. The next best weapon he had was a rifle grenade. While waiting for the mortar, he went down the hill with several rifle grenades. Murray was able to keep them [Annotator's Note: the German troops to his front] preoccupied with the rifle grenade fire. He was the only one who was firing because he had the only unobstructed view. The next weapon they brought to bear was a Browning Automatic Rifle. It was a good weapon. Murray fired two to five round bursts. On Murray's left the hill went up and on his right was a little embankment. Two of his men were right below the embankment. When he ran low on ammunition he would toss the empty magazines to the two men who would reload them then toss them back to him. Murray has no idea how long this went on but it was quite a bit of time. Someone told Murray he fired about 2,000 rounds from the Browning Automatic Rifle. Some of the Germans began to vacate their position. A German truck came towards Murray when he was firing the automatic rifle. He was surprised to see this vehicle coming at him. He had no idea a vehicle that large could get down that little road. As the driver turned toward the Rhine River, Murray fired two bursts which killed the driver and passenger. In the back of the truck were three 120mm mortars and ammunition for them. Those were just a few of the weapons the Germans were using. The Germans had been planning a counterattack. After Murray knocked out the truck, the Germans decided that they had had enough and began to run back through the wire and the grape vineyards. Murray continued to fire on them. About that time, the mortar section leader arrived with the mortar. They put it into position then Murray took over and fired the weapon. His first round landed exactly where he wanted it. He continued until the Germans entered the town. He caused a lot of casualties. After he stopped firing he began moving down the hill following the retreating Germans. He and his men captured some Germans at the bottom of the hill. There was one young German in a foxhole who put his hands up when Murray passed. Murray told his lead scout not to shoot the man and they took him prisoner. Murray still knows the German today. [Annotator's Note: Video freezes from 1:02:59:492 to 1:04:41:982 where the segment ends.]

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Charles Murray was going down the hill with his soldiers behind him. As he got down toward the bottom where two sunken roads met there were other German soldiers who surrendered. At the bottom by the sunken road there was a small religious monument. Close by was a German soldier who stood up and put his hands up. When Murray turned his back on the man to call back to his men to alert them to another German soldier the man in the foxhole took the opportunity to toss a hand grenade at Murray. When the grenade exploded Murray hit the ground. He knew he had been hit pretty good. When Murray stood up the German put his hands back up. The soldier running behind Murray was going to shoot the man but Murray stopped him. As the other soldiers got to the bottom Murray sent them down to the area where the Germans had been. He told them to take any prisoners they could and destroy any of the weapons they found. At the road Murray spoke with the lieutenant about where he was going to deploy his platoon and his recoilless rifles. Murray thought the plan was a good one so he waited for the men to get into position then he went back up the hill in search of medical attention. Murray told his executive officer what the situation was and that he was in command. He then gave his First Sergeant his helmet, pistol, and GI issue watch. By this time several prisoners had been brought up. Two of them were on stretchers. Murray decided to lead them back down the hill where he turned them over to the military police. Murray's radio man went with him to the aid station because he was suffering from frozen feet. After treating his wounds, Murray was put in an ambulance. Murray's radioman was sent to another hospital that dealt with frozen feet. Murray was tended to at the hospital then about 24 hours after he arrived he was operated on. The hospital was an old Army hospital near St. Die, France. After two or three days Murray was able to walk a little so he volunteered to help the nurses.

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Around Christmas [Annotator's Note: Christmas 1944], Charles Murray learned that people in the hospital were being sent back. He was in an evacuation hospital and was due to go to a general hospital but got the word that due to the high casualty rate he would be sent to a replacement depot instead and from there would be assigned to another unit. He wanted to go back to his company [Annotator's Note: Company C, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division]. Murray asked the doctor to get him ready. The doctor refused but a few nights later the ward sergeant grabbed him and brought him to the doctor who then operated on him. Murray was released on the assurance that he would report to his battalion surgeon to get his stitches taken out. Then he went to the depot where uniforms were stored and found one that fit him. Then he hitched rides back to the 30th Infantry Regiment aid station. Since no one was heading down toward Kaysersberg, Murray started walking. Fortunately, a jeep came by that was headed for his battalion headquarters so he hopped on it. By this time it was dark. Murray went into the battalion command post which was set up in the town of Kaysersberg. When he went in they were having dinner. The regimental commander was there. The battalion S3, the operations officer, had also been wounded and had done the same thing Murray had done and just left the hospital and returned to the unit. Murray had a steak then had one of his wire men take him back to the company which was in the same place it had been when he was wounded. The company had seen a lot of fighting and the platoon that Murray had gone down into the valley with had been surrounded. They had fought their way back up the hill then the next day they fought their way back down again. During his absence the lieutenant had been wounded and evacuated. Five men were also wounded but not seriously. Three days after Murray got back they got word that a new unit would be replacing them on New Year's Day [Annotator's Note: 1 January 1945]. This unit had been in theater for three of four weeks but had never been in combat. There was no problem and after everyone was in position Murray's company was replaced. Murray left one of his officers and a couple of his sergeants with the new unit to aid in the transition and the rest of the company moved out to enjoy several days of rest. They got some replacements of personnel and equipment and began getting ready for the next operation. Murray remained with his company for the rest of the war except for another short stay in the hospital. They cleaned out the Colmar Pocket by the end of February then went to Nancy, France for retraining. They then assaulted through the Siegfried Line and across the Rhine River in assault boats near the town of Worms, Germany. They fought through Nuremberg. Murray's company was the first into Munich. The last soldier wounded during the war was hit by a sniper in Munich. The round tore off his ear lobe but he was otherwise unharmed.

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Charles Murray's company [Annotator's Note: Company C, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division] entered Munich on 30 April [Annotator's Note: 30 April 1945]. Some of the Germans were hanging up white flags. Their job, along with Company B, was to capture some nearby bridges. They came across a camp containing 2,000 British soldiers which Murray's company liberated. The senior German officer in charge turned over the roster to an American officer who ordered him to stay where he was. They also liberated a slave labor camp with 2,000 or 3,000 Slavic women in it. Murray had a Russian speaking soldier who told the women to stay where they were. They gave the women whatever food they had and some bars of soap. Murray got word that there was a POW camp with Americans in it. It turned out that the prisoners were British soldiers who had been captured at Dunkirk and had been prisoners since 1940. In the meantime, the Company B commander was wounded and the company stopped. When they got to the river, Murray was by himself. There was a little bit of fighting but they managed to capture the bridges. Murray then got a message identifying the location of the rest of his battalion. The day they entered Munich was the same day Hitler died which was why the people were cheering [Annotator's Note: German dictator Adolf Hitler committed suicide on 30 April 1945]. Murray's regiment entered Salzburg, Austria on 5 May and was billeted there. Two days later Murray got a call ordering him to cease fire. The next day the war was over. Murray found out that his was the division commander's only guard company. They continued to train and received replacements. He had ten people still with the company who had landed in North Africa in November 1942. Murray was told that he had been recommended for the Medal of Honor back in March. He got a letter from his wife dated 8 June containing a newspaper clipping that he had been awarded the Medal of Honor. That is how he found out that it had been approved. The division found out about it the same way he did. On 4 July the division received word that General Patton [Annotator's Note: US Army Lieutenant General George S. Patton] would be in Salzburg to award the division with the Presidential Unit Citation and would also award Murray his Medal of Honor. Murray marched out to the Salzburg Airport and General Keyes [Annotator's Note: US Army Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes] did the honors because Patton could not be there. Later in July, Murray's unit moved into Germany for occupation duty. They were facing the Russians. For the last month there, Murray was assigned to battalion headquarters. Then he got orders to return to the United States aboard the first available surface transportation. He was allowed to travel back by air instead. He left the Army then started his senior year at Chapel Hill. After graduating he went back into the Army in September 1946. Murray retired on 31 July 1973 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina.

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Charles Murray captured about ten German soldiers then continued on, allowing his men to collect the prisoners [Annotator's Note: see segment titled Engaging the Enemy]. Murray was hit by a potato masher grenade. When it went off, he did not even know it was a grenade. He was peppered with shrapnel from his calf to the middle of his back. When he got back from the hospital one of his men asked him why he had not allowed him to shoot the German that did him in and explained to him what had happened. Murray hopes that if he had known about the man throwing the grenade he would have acted the same way. The German soldier looked to be 18 or 19 years old, like most of Murray's soldiers. Murray was in his early 20s by then and an old man. That is what it takes to fight an infantry war. War now is different. [Annotator's Note: Murray starts coughing and the camera stops for a moment.] Murray realized after learning about the German soldier throwing the grenade at him that anyone could be hurt at any time. Many of the men were young but there were some older soldiers. At the time, Murray was fighting a unit that had been brought down from Norway. The infantry, including Marines and anyone else who fights in hand to hand combat, was the group that suffered most of the casualties. Things are different now. Murray met a German soldier while in the hospital. It was the man in the bed next to him. Murray was the one who shot the man in the stomach. A few beds away was a ten year old boy who had lost his leg during an artillery barrage. That boy was the best patient on the ward. To Murray it showed that the Americans took care of the enemy and civilians as well as they took care of their own.

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During the action for which Charles Murray was awarded the Medal of Honor, he was not thinking about anything except what he had been trained to do. He knew he was not going to be wounded. The recommendation for the Medal of Honor in the Army requires two eye witnesses. In Murray's case, one of the men was his BAR [Annotator's Note: Browning Automatic Rifle] man. The other was one of the lieutenants. They just put him in for a medal and it turned out to be the Medal of Honor. Murray believes that had he not been wounded he would have received a lower award. When Murray learned that he was receiving the Medal he told his First Sergeant. Then he went back to work commanding his company [Annotator's Note: Company C, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division]. By this time he was a captain. Murray was the last one in the division who was awarded the Medal of Honor who was still in Europe. Murray's action took place on 16 December 1944. Audie Murphy's action took place on 26 January 1945. Murray was protecting a river bridgehead and they were pretty beat up. Audie Murphy's Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, passed through Murray's position to replace them on the line for a few days. There is a hill about two miles from Kaysersberg and from the top of that hill the locations can be seen where, within six weeks, seven men of the 3rd Infantry Division performed the actions for which they would receive the Medal of Honor. Murray's action was the first action. He knows the dates and locations of those men and their actions. One of the recipients was an artilleryman. All the others were infantrymen.

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[Annotator's Note: Charles Murray served as a platoon commander, then company commander, in Company C, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division.] By the time the Americans ran up against the Siegfried Line the Germans had lost a lot of troops. They had really taken a beating. When Murray's company left France on 15 or 16 March [Annotator's Note: 15 or 16 March 1945], they fought through the German Winter Line. A few days later they went through the Siegfried Line. There, the Germans had deep tank traps and concrete and steel emplacements. One of Murray's BAR [Annotator's Note: Browning Automatic Rifle] men in the 3rd Platoon was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. They fought through the Siegfried Line. Murray's company was the first into Zweibrucken. They were driving in trucks following an armored division. They had an assault crossing of the Rhine River. The motor on the boat Murray was in went dead in the middle of the river. Murray's company was not fired on during the crossing. They crossed one river three times. Nuremberg was a great victory for the 3rd Infantry Division. During the fight, Murray was on a rest leave. From Nuremberg they continued down to Salzburg. That is where they were when the war in Europe ended. The war in the Pacific ended on 15 August [Annotator's Note: 15 August 1945]. Munich was the largest city Murray fought in. The map had showed the city about the size of a quarter or 50 cent piece. Murray decided to follow the street car tracks. There were some displaced persons, as well as German civilians, who were willing to give him directions. He located the bridge and found that there were some street cars turned upside down on them that were being used as fortifications. After a short battle, Murray's men captured both bridges. An hour after dark, Murray got a message to continue moving southeast into Austria. Murray saw some hard fighting going into the Siegfried Line. The tail end of his company was hit by artillery fire. Most of his men were in position and fighting but one group was missing. Murray went back to see what happened but could not find the men he was looking for. Then Murray and the soldier he was with were hit by a heavy artillery barrage and were forced to take cover for a while. Murray was worried that he would be wounded after learning that he had been recommended for the Medal of Honor. During one artillery barrage, Murray's First Sergeant lost his leg.

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[Annotator's Note: Charles Murray served as a platoon commander, then company commander, in Company C, 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division.] These days it is a little easier for the spouses of veterans who are deployed overseas. During World War 2, the relatives of a soldier who was killed or wounded just received a telegram stating what had happened to their loved one. Additionally, when they were sent overseas their families were on their own. Things are a little different now. Some of the men Murray went through OCS [Annotator's Note: officer candidate school] with were sent to divisions immediately. It was difficult living in the United States at that time, especially when responsible for their own housing. As a second lieutenant, Murray was making 125 dollars per month. When he first entered the Army, the base pay had just been increased from 21 dollars a month to 50 dollars a month. After Murray got married, his base pay was increased to 80 dollars a month. Some of the wives found jobs to help out. It is a great honor to be awarded the Medal of Honor. Murray has been wearing his since 5 July 1945. There is no getting used to it. Murray only wears his on special occasions, such as when he speaks to school groups. With very few exceptions the majority of Medal of Honor recipients believe that they did not deserve it and that they wear the medal not for themselves, but for those guys who never came back. When security at airports got tighter some Medal of Honor recipients were told to turn their Medals over. Most of them refused. Now if there is a problem they are to tell security to call the nearest FBI agent. In addition to the Medal of Honor, during World War 2, Murray received the Silver Star with two oak leaf clusters, Bronze Star with Combat V and oak leaf cluster, and the Purple Heart. He was also awarded a number of service and theater awards. He was also awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge with two stars, one for World War 2 and another for Vietnam. The French awarded him the Croix de Guerre and Legion of Honor Officer Class. The Vietnamese awarded him the Vietnamese Cross in Gold. The Legion of Honor may be awarded to someone in the military or a civilian.

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Charles Murray served during the Korean War but by the time he got over there the war had ended. He did see action in Vietnam. Both of Murray's sons served in helicopter units, one as a pilot and the other as a crew chief on a Chinook. His daughter is married to a guy who was in the Navy. Murray's second son started college but left to go into the military. After he got out of the service he got his degree in Florida and while going to school he worked for the local police department as a dispatcher. After returning to where his parents lived he got a job with the local sheriff's department then later went to work for the US Marshalls Service. He had been wounded in Vietnam and was no longer able to fly helicopters so he got out of the service. Murray made colonel while on duty at the Pentagon. He was then made deputy commander of the 196th Light Infantry Brigade. After training that unit as the deputy commander he went to Vietnam with them. Six or eight months after going to Vietnam, Murray was transferred to the 9th Infantry Division as commander of its 3rd Brigade. Murray attended the National War College then went to the Army staff. In 1960 he joined the 3rd Infantry Regiment at Fort Myer [Annotator's Note: Fort Myer, Virginia] then went to the National War College in 1962. In 1963 he went to the Pentagon to the Army staff then went to the 196th Light Infantry Brigade. When he returned from Vietnam he went to the joint staff in the Pentagon.

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Charles Murray feels that it is important to study all wars. The history of this country is based on warfare and soldiers who fought them. Every war we have fought in has had something to do with the advancement of this country. Fortunately, there were and are enough people willing to fight for this country. World War 2 was a turning point. The United States was a good country but not the greatest which it became as a result of World War 2. The GI Bill made college possible for people who otherwise would never have been able to go. World War 2 also made the United States a more mobile country. World War 2 was the impetus of moving ahead for this country but Korea, Vietnam, and the current conflicts should also not be forgotten. Murray learned from being wounded. He never made the same mistake twice. Murray was able to go to college and get his degree. Because of the war he married the best lady in the world. Murray was not changed as much as many of those veterans who returned to civilian life because he made the military a career. For those considering a career in the military who is married and has a family, everybody has to love it. A military career is a family affair. Both partners have to like the military. The military was a good arrangement for Murray and his family. Museums are very important. Whenever Murray goes on vacation he tries to put museums on his itinerary. He also likes touring churches and cathedrals. Museums are a way of teaching the young and old about our past. [Annotator's Note: The video skips several times.] When Murray went back into the service after World War 2, he served with a number of units. He was with 8th Army Headquarters in Korea. He was with the 82nd Airborne Division. He served with the 9th Infantry Division in Vietnam. While at Fort Jackson in 1947 he was assigned to the 5th Infantry Division. He also served with the 3rd Infantry Regiment which is his favorite unit today.

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